Not Such Bad Luck

Once upon a time in far-off China, there lived a farmer who had only one son — one precious heir to whom he would leave his small property. The farmer also had one horse. One day this horse managed to get out of his corral and ran off.

“Such bad luck!” the neighbors said to the man.

“Don’t speak too soon,” said the farmer. “How can you know if this is really bad luck?”

The neighbors were really surprised the next evening when the horse showed up with a dozen other wild horses following him. He led them into the corral and the farmer’s son quickly ran and shut the gate.

When they saw that he now had thirteen horses the neighbors congratulated the farmer. “This is such good luck for you!”

“Don’t speak too soon,” said the wise farmer. “How do you know this is going to be a good thing for us?”

Some days later the son attempted to break one of the wild horses, but the wild stallion would have none of it. He bucked frantically and the young man fell off, breaking his leg.

Neighbors shook their heads when they saw the injured son. “You were right, old man. This has been very bad luck.”

“Don’t speak too soon,” the old man calmly repeated. “How can you be sure of that?”

A few days later a local warlord came through the village and ordered all the able-bodied young men to come with him to help fight in his war. But when he saw the farmer’s son hobbling along, he shook his head. “This boys is of no use to me.”

So the farmer’s son was left behind because of his broken leg. The other young men who were forced to accompany the warlord in his conflict were never seen again. The farmer and his son rejoiced over the “bad luck” that turned out to be their biggest blessing.

There are times in everyone’s life when something constructive is born out of adversity.  – Lee Iaccoacca

Appreciaton: Love’s Life Blood

When we lived in a small town in Ontario, I got together quite often with an elderly widow who lived down the block. I know that she missed her husband very much; they’d had such a happy home. She often told me about his attitude and what a blessing it was to her every day.

“Ernie was left motherless at a very early age. Then his father went out West and left him in the care of his grandmother and other relatives, knocked from pillar to post as it were. He never knew a proper home, so when he finally had one he was so happy for it. In all our years together never a day went by but what he told me how thankful he was to have a home of his own.

We were young, in our early twenties, but so naive. We had very little money when we got married, just enough to pay the rent and buy some furniture. But Ernie was sure that we were meant for each other and he never worried a lot about money. He had a strong faith and trusted that the Lord would provide.

Then came the Depression years and he had no steady work for five years. We were often down almost to our last dime–in fact one time we only had four cents in the house! Something would always turn up, though; the Lord always provided for us and we made it through those tough years.”

I am sure that this man’s attitude made their home a more pleasant place than many a rich man’s home! Wouldn’t we all be easier to live with if we’d cultivate a thankful heart and express our appreciation more? (But in this day and age maintaining a contented heart is an uphill climb, when advertisers tell us daily how we still need THEIR product in order to be totally happy.)

I do believe that love can conquer many obstacles. Two people together can accomplish things that they never could if each worked alone — if they can work together and not chip away at what the other does. When you have someone you love by your side you have something far more valuable and a force far more powerful than a fat bank account or a fancy new home.

The Gracious Way to Get There

IT ISN’T COSTLY

Does the grouch get richer quicker than the friendly sort of man?
Can the grumbler labor better than the cheerful fellow can?
Is the mean and churlish neighbor any cleverer than the one
who shouts a glad “Good morning,” and then smiling passes on?

Just stop and think about it.  Have you ever known or seen
a mean man who succeeded just because he was so mean?
When you find a grouch with honors and with money in his pouch,
you can bet he didn’t win them just because he was a grouch.

Oh, you’ll not be any poorer if you smile along your way,
and your lot will not be harder for the kindly things you say.
Don’t imagine you are wasting time for others that you spend;
You can rise to wealth and glory and still pause to be a friend.

written by Edgar Guest

From the book A Heap O’ Livin’
© 1916 by The Reilly & Britton Co.

Blog Renovation

Hear Ye, Hear Ye:

I’ve done a major renovation on my Christine Goodnough blog. I’ve decided to  use this address as my online journal, and as a note to friends telling about some of the happenings in my everyday life. I also want to post occasional quotes that strike me as particularly inspiring.

Drop by and check out the new look.
christinegoodnough.wordpress.com

Enjoying the Riches?

Or hanging out in the pig pen?

A fellow Meandering writer shares this new flash of insight she received while reading the Parable of the Prodigal Son. Our Father has banned pity parties in His house.

http://meanderingswithgod.wordpress.com/2013/02/21/the-prodigal-son/

Calamity or Blessing?

There are times in everyone’s life when something constructive is born out of adversity. – Lee Iacocca

There’s an old Chinese legend about a farmer who had one son and one horse. One day while the two men were away the horse managed to get out of his corral and ran off.

“Such bad luck!” the neighbors said to the man.

“Don’t speak too soon,” said the farmer. “How can you know if this is really bad luck?”

The neighbors were really surprised the next evening when the horse came back up with a dozen wild horses following him. He led them into the corral and the farmer’s son quickly ran and shut the gate.

When they saw that he now had thirteen horses, the neighbors congratulated the farmer. “This is such good luck for you!”

“Don’t speak too soon,” said the wise farmer. “How do you know this is going to be a good thing for us?”

Some days later the son attempted to break one of the wild horses, but the wild stallion would have none of it. He bucked frantically and the young man fell off, breaking his leg.

Neighbors shook their heads when they saw the injured son. “You were right, old man. This has been very bad luck.”

“Don’t speak too soon,” the old man calmly repeated. “How can you be sure of that?”

A few days later a local prince came through the village and ordered all the able-bodied young men to come with him to help fight his war, but the farmer’s son was left behind because of his broken leg. The other young men were never seen again. The farmer and his son rejoiced over the “bad luck” that kept him from being conscripted, too.

What we see as a disaster sometimes proves to be one of our biggest blessings.

Fractured Phrases

Note from me:
Lilly has come up with a good list of what NOT to say in the way of consolation.

A p r o n h e a d -- Lilly

159 - Copy

It’s only money

is easy to say when you have some.

This too shall pass

only applies to the things that do, not the things that don’t.

Get over it

is harder to do when you feel flat under it.

Cheer up

is hard to master when you are down.

I’ll be praying for you

is only good when it is real and not just a God bless you after a sneeze.

View original post

Dementia

Antiquarian Anabaptist

There are things that I wish that I would have understood better when my parents were suffering with dementia.  Above all, I wish I could have understood that even though their personalities had changed and their memories seemed to be gone, the father and mother that I had once known were still there, though unable to communicate.

I am beginning to understand how important it is to talk to such people and demonstrate our love in other ways, even though we see no sign of understanding and response.  And in some way that is unfathomable to us, God is still able to communicate with people with dementia.

Yesterday I attended a volunteer appreciation tea, put on by one of the hospitals in Saskatoon, for those who are involved in the Sunday morning chapel services.  The conversation got around to how important it is to older people to hear the familiar…

View original post 299 more words

The Salesman Gets A Shock

by Edgar Guest

The salesman saw his shabby clothes and eyed him head to toe;
so rough a looking man, thought he, could not be good to know;
and since he sold expensive cars, which only rich men buy,
to sell to the ragged-looking man he did not even try.

The stranger walked among the cars and looked the models o’er,
the youthful salesman passed him by a dozen times or more;
not once he paused to talk to him; he scorned the proffered smile
and looked about for richer men who might be more worth while.

The manager came out at last and saw the shabby man.
His hand went out in welcome as he shouted, “Hello, Dan!”
“Hello, Bill,” said the shabby man. “My daughter wants a car
and I’ve been noseying around to see how good they are.

Send up the red one over there; she likes to cut a dash.”
And reaching in his wallet he drew out the price in cash.
“My women wear the style for me. You know my ways are quaint.
My word,” said he, “I think that boy has fallen in a faint!”

They brought the youthful salesman to, and sent him home to rest.
“Don’t ever judge a man,” said they, “by how he may be dressed.
You lost a good cash customer, but write this lesson down:
‘Not all the worth while people strut in worsted ‘round the town.’ ”

From his book The Light of Faith
© 1926 by The Reilly & Lee Co.